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Code Differences

Traditional Homes: Code Differences


A federal construction code.


The HUD Code is administered by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, using independent third party inspection agencies for enforcement, and it is the federal counterpart to nationally recognized private sector model building codes such as the International Residential Code (IRC) adopted by the Louisiana Legislature in 2005.

The HUD Code is the only code that is mandated to be nationally recognized, and as such it has preemptive status with respect to factory-built homes. This national preemptive status is one very important reason why factory-built homes are so affordable.


Designed for factory building.

The HUD Code is unique since it is specifically designed for compatibility with the factory production process. Performance standards for heating, plumbing, air conditioning, thermal and electrical systems are set in the code.


High standards. Lower cost.

In addition, performance requirements are established for structural design, construction, fire safety, energy efficiency, and transportation from the factory to the customer’s home site. Factory-built homes are constructed with virtually the same materials used in site-built homes. However, in contrast to traditional site-building techniques, factory-built homes have the advantage of using engineered design applications and the most cost-efficient assembly line techniques to produce a quality home at a much lower cost/per square foot.



Look for the red seal of quality.


To ensure quality, the design and construction of the home is monitored by both HUD and its monitoring contractor, the National Conference of States on Building Codes and Standards (NCSBCS). The familiar red seal (the certification label) attached to the exterior of a factory-built home indicated that it has undergone perhaps the most thorough inspection process in the homebuilding industry – and passes.